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How often do you have conversations about the Beltline? How often do you have conversations about the Beltline on the Beltline? Housing Justice League needs volunteers to have a consistent presence on the BeltLine to inform, take up space, raise awareness, and get the petition signed for reallocating resources towards affordable housing. Are you interested in making affordable housing a political priority in the City of Atlanta to end mass displacement? Come volunteer as a petition canvasser for the #Beltline4All campaign on the Beltline! #takeupspace #signthepetition #affordablehousing

We will have tall #Beltline4all displays and clipboards to collect signatures. With your help we can collect thousands of signatures to pressure city officials to meaningfully invest in affordable housing that truly meets community needs along the footprint of the Beltline.

Thousands of people walk on the BeltLine every day with little understanding or willful ignorance of the harm this public-private mega development project is causing to long-term communities of color. It’s time for Atlanta residents to take a political stand on the affordable housing crisis. Through the petition drive we will ask people to think critically and act ethically. The City of Atlanta must reallocate resources towards affordable housing and end tax breaks for corporate development.

A lot of people (especially higher income newcomers) do not think about how private investment and gentrification harm low-income communities of color. Many people we talk with through our work on affordable housing politics will say that gentrification is the only way to “improve” historically marginalized and disinvested communities. Housing Justice League does not see it as “improvement” when communities are no longer there to access the new amenities brought in by gentrification. Or, if they are still there, the new amenities are unaffordable and aren’t appropriate for their needs.

We are bringing together residents concerned with issues related to the BeltLine's development and working together to develop a collective action campaign using the research and information we've gathered, and our personal experiences of displacement, to organize for a BeltLine for All, and Development Without Displacement. If you live in a BeltLine neighborhood and are impacted by the rising costs associated with the BeltLine, join our campaign! We meet  Wednesday evenings at 6:00 at PRC, 1101 Hank Aaron Drive.

The BeltLine promised much needed services and opportunities to historically disinvested communities, but failed to recognize the need to center residents’ voices within decision-making processes in order to meet the critical needs of long-time residents and avoid the historical and continuing patterns of racism, displacement, and disinvestment. What we have seen so far makes clear the disparity in power between low-income communities and wealthy developers. Our campaign is working to reverse the unjust trends that have been set with the BeltLine development project.

Mass education and community organizing will create strong measures of accountability to reverse these patterns. We are working to promote a recognition of differences in the cultures and needs of low-income communities and to put residents voices at the center of decision-making processes. Massive urban development projects like the BeltLine must provide reinvestment to the communities that big developers consistently take advantage of.

Our approach includes:

  • Mass education among both long-time residents and newcomers through popular education workshops

  • Holding public officials responsible to push for equitable, anti-racist policies

  • Direct action and protest to engage wider audiences